Boccardo as Morel aspires to build a world where memory images persist at the same time as reality. It does not mean to represent but reproduce: the artist is an inventor that builds object replicas that do not exist. The real thing is not the object of the representation but the space where a fantastic world takes place. In this way his work secretly links with certain traditions of Argentine literature: as in Macedonio Fernández or in Adolfo Bioy Casares, the fundamental not being the way where the real appears in fiction, but the way where fiction appears in reality.
Boccardo acts as an archeologist that exhumes rests of an ancient civilization. He does not discover or fix the real until it already is a group of ruins (and in this way, of course, he has done elusive and subtle political art). Now taking the materials of two novels that happen at parallel times and coming back with some objects rescued from the shipwreck. It is better to say that this exposition is about two men (Morel and Russo) that invented two magic machines to perpetuate two lost women.
Boccardo is related to these stubborn inventors that keep alive what has stopped existing. We do know that the Egyptians named the sculptor as “The One-who-keeps-alive”. “Morel’s invention” and “The absent city”, if I am not mistaken are about this: how to perpetuate what has disappeared, or better, what to do with the lost images and voices that persist as ghosts in the holes of memory.

Ricardo Piglia
(Fragment)

“La invención de Morel” (“Morel’s invention”),
by Adolfo Bioy Casares
1996
(Fragment)
200 m2
“La ciudad ausente”
(“The absent city”)
by Ricardo Piglia
1996
(Fragment)
200 m2